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Part-Baked Games: Chef's edition

Part-Baked Games: Chef’s edition has been developed in partnership with Outright Games and introduces students to the concept of prototyping; both on paper and digitally. Learners begin by creating a paper prototype for their own version of Gigantosaurus and then a digital prototype based on these ideas.

Students can use the recipe cards included in the resource pack for this workshop to aid them in building their games. They then compare this prototype to the realised title and choose one feature to add to their own game. Students then modify their game.

Part-Baked Games

Often, learning how to create a game can be quite daunting, especially when you consider all the elements that are needed to build it. Part-Baked Games provides the learner with the opportunity to create five different games that are inspired by the BAFTA YGD rule cards in order to teach learners how to build common game mechanics and therefore provide them with the tools needed to create their own game at a later date. Each of the games are provided in a ‘Part-Baked’ form which means that all assets required for the game have been added and laid out as though the game were complete.

Machine Code Mario

This workshop introduces students to binary in an innovative way. Starting with investigating why computers use binary, students explore how to represent decimal numbers in binary and then how to use this knowledge to create Super Mario courses using Super Mario Maker 2 that test the players understanding of binary representation. The design, exploration and development stages of the beginner workshop fit nicely into KS2.

Starlink: Battle for Atlas

This resource was originally developed by Magic Makers which is a Paris-based coding school developing creative programming workshop for kids. Since 2014, they have introduced more than 10, 000 children to the basics of coding, with the ultimate objective of contributing to the development of creative programming in France. In preparation of the launch of Starlink: Battle for Atlas on October 16 2018, Ubisoft and Magic Makers collaborated to create a dedicated coding program based on the universe of the game. 

Robo-Challenge

The Robo-Challenge workshop is based on materials from the IBM Robo-Challenge competition. A yearly challenge run for year 5 and 6 students in the greater London area. The intention of this workshop is to integrate these outstanding resources within the Digital Schoolhouse educational framework and allow more students to be able to benefit from them.

iRobot

This workshop asks and answers the question ‘What is artificial intelligence?’. Machines can do the most clever things, from beating humans at chess to flying planes and producing works of art. But machines carry these activities out by following computer programs. Programs written by humans. The machines are simply following the rules. So then where does the intelligence lie?

Big Data

Big data is big business. 

This workshop explains how and why companies make money from our data. Students begin by learning about the difference between data and information, examine how an algorithm to find the highest number in a list will use a sorting algorithm and introduce the concept of filtering. 

Switched on Sound

This workshop gives students the opportunity to explore some of the history of computerised music, including automation, punch cards and the development of digital music by composing their own multitracked piece of music using a Nintendo LABO piano. LABO is Nintendo’s DIY cardboard kit crafted to work with Nintendo Switch. 

Digital Footprint

The ‘Digital Footprint’ project was developed by the Digital Schoolhouse and V. Allen from Millais School to introduce pupils to the concept that their online activity leaves in effect a ‘digital footprint’ that can be used to identify them.

True or False?

The ‘True or False’ workshop was developed by the Digital Schoolhouse and V. Allen from Millais School to introduce and reinforce the idea that not all news found online is trustworthy and reliable. The aim is to gets the pupils to question what they see on the Internet. Is it real? Is it biased? Is it false?

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